48 hours in Kyoto
through the eyes of Lauren Wells

Once the capital of Japan, Kyoto is a city steeped in history, mixing modern life with beautiful traditions. Perhaps the most wonderful way to experience "true" Kyoto is to stay at a traditional inn, and no ryokan can compare to the 145-year old Kaneamean Nishitomiya.

48 hours in Kyoto | through the eyes of Lauren Wells

Once the capital of Japan, Kyoto is a city steeped in history, mixing modern life with beautiful traditions. Perhaps the most wonderful way to experience "true" Kyoto is to stay at a traditional inn, and no ryokan can compare to the 145-year old Kaneamean Nishitomiya.

It was at the Arabica in Higashiyama that we watched as two geishas in kimonos styled their iced lattes for Instagram, with a 5-story Buddhist temple in the background. The juxtaposition gives the city so much charm, and offers an immersion into the culture, both past and present.

Staying at a traditional inn remains the most wonderful way to experience « true » Kyoto, and no ryokan can compare to the 145-year old Kaneamean Nishitomiya. From the moment you step barefoot onto the plush carpeting and are escorted to your tatami-mat room, you know your stay is going to be something special. Favorite details included the kimonos (to be worn at both breakfast and dinner), the wooden tub for soaking, and the incredible art collection throughout. Dinners were traditional Kaiseki, while breakfasts came with the choice of "Western" or "Traditional." Our hosts had impeccable taste in wine, and their collection complemented every meal to perfection. While we were not relaxing in our garden-view room, or dining on Japanese maple smoked fish, we were wandering the beautiful neighborhoods surrounding this Inn, soaking in every ounce of Kyoto's culture.

Riley is waking up on a bed of tataki mats. /
Afternoon R&R, reading the newest Instants.
Ready for our traditional Japanese breakfast, and our morning green tea!
Tourists from Hong Kong leaving the Yasaka Shrine, dressed in traditional kimonos. /
Traditional paper lanterns lining a temple.
Finding solace amidst a crowd of umbrellas. The Golden Temple shining bright on a rainy day. /
Sitting outside the most beautiful ryokan in Kyoto. With Weekenders Coffee in the neighboring lot, Nishiki Market two blocks away and every other neighborhood within walking distance, the location could not be better.
A crowd pleaser at the Nishiki Market: baby octopus stuffed with quail eggs. /
Fresh seafood at Nishiki Market.
Indulging all five senses at Nishiki Market. /
Japanese pickled vegetables at the Market.
The most beautiful Japanese maples, as seen in Arashiyama. /
Enjoying our evening Kaiseki meal at the ryokan.
The omnipresent Japanese soft serve. Favorite flavors included sweet cream and matcha.
The most beautiful presentation, and the most precise attention to detail. /
This dish was one of many remarkable dishes served during our evening Kaiseki dinners.

 

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